What sort of future do our kids get

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Future Families – What sort of future do our kids get? As a family therapist for the past two decades, I have seen many changes occurring at an escalating rate. Issues relating to our kids future are also changing, a lot.

Of course, we all know the issues relating to children spending more time in front of a screen, and parents struggle with that. What about how  issues in relation to our kids future are going to change over the next couple of decades. What issues are our teens and children going to be exposed to within the next twenty years? Have we really given it much of a thought?

I have been working on this for many years. Looking at the way relationships, communication and children have changed. I have also researched how our kids are going to enter the workforce in years to come, the best jobs to venture toward and the equality issues we are still facing within society.

I write this in regards to our kids future as far as work prospects. This I see as a significant issue, not regarding getting work as there is going to be an abundance of work around. No, in regards to the direction our children are not getting toward that future, even now.

 

Here is how the government Science Agenda, 2017, views future jobs. Note the missing reference to computer logistics and analytics. Concerning? 

 

In a recent National Scientific Statement, it was found participation in science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) subjects in Australian schools was declining. Enrolments are at the lowest level in 20 years. Did you know there has been a downturn in our kids studying science, technology and maths? I was shocked to discover these new figures and started wondering the reason that this was occurring. I have determined why?

Our kids are smart, very in tune with technology, very forward thinking and worldly intelligent. So what could possibly be the reason they are dropping out of science, technology and maths?

I believe it is lack of qualified teacher to pass on additional information our kids are yet to learn. I have spoken to many teens about this. The most common response is that they believe they know more than the teacher, or the teacher can’t or won’t teach what they want and need to learn to survive in this new world. Perhaps it is a curriculum issue, or maybe it is a teaching issue. Perhaps the latter seems to be more applicable.

What then can we do.

To make sure our kids get a future that is filled with opportunities, it is up to all of us the ensure they move in the right direction.

  1. Make sure we have more informed, up to date, qualified teaching staff for our high schools and most certainly our universities and colleges.
  2. Pay these technological teachers more. To attract those abreast of the new technology that continues to change, we must pay more than $70,000 – $80,000 per year.
  3. Listen to what industry is telling us as they need program analysts urgently and this drive will continue.
  4. We need more creative computer scientists and logistic analysts who can create new change. We can’t teach students this with outdated teaching staff and old curriculums.

I know one local firm who scored a half million dollar government contract and they needed staff. They advertised for 200 technology staff in science, analysis, logistics and received two applications. They also had an admin job going, only one, and got 200 applications. Something is very wrong.

Perhaps we need to reconsider our current educational framework as clearly with fewer students undertaking these imminent and needed jobs. This country is not going to manage well in the future.

Read more at Dr Karen 

Here is the full ABC article relating to this matter